Presentations

Below are upcoming research presentations using EdSHARe survey data from High School & Beyond and/or the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972. EdSHARe principal investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and staff, and other researchers with access to the HS&B and/or NLS-72 data regularly present their findings at conferences and other academic gatherings. The listings below contain a brief overview of the topic and information on where and how to view the presentation. See the Previous Presentations sidebar for information on past presentations.

Presentations

Unpacking the Relationship Between Education and Dementia in Diverse Populations

John Robert Warren, University of Minnesota

This presentation was part of an IAPHS pre-conference workshop that discussed data, measurement, and funding opportunities in education and aging research. Rob Warren presented on the EdSHARe project and the HSB and NLS-72 cohort studies.

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Understanding the Educational Gradient in Cognitive Function at Midlife

Eric Grodsky, University of Wisconsin

The main focus of this presentation and its related paper, led by PI Eric Grodsky, is to quantify the association between education and cognitive function at age ~60, and to estimate the potential contributions of educational opportunities and achievements by adolescents to those patterns.

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High School Education, Science Knowledge, and Adult Health Behaviors: Longitudinal Data and the COVID-19 Pandemic

Emily Lybbert, University of Texas; Isabella Stade, University of Minnesota; John Robert Warren, University of Minnesota; Eric Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; Chandra Muller, University of Texas

The General Social Survey (GSS) has been the main source of information about science knowledge in the United States. However, not much is known about how science knowledge is formed, developed, and changed across an individual’s life. We use the High School and Beyond (HS&B) survey, a longitudinal, nationally representative sample of…

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College Expectations of Teachers and Degree Attainment of Students

Koit Hung, University of Texas at Austin

This research seeks to answer two questions: 1) are students with all their teachers expecting them to attend college more likely to complete 4-year degrees? and 2) Is the association stronger for students with more teachers expecting them to attend college? We use the nationally representative High School and Beyond sample data to assess the…

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Intergenerational Occupational Mobility and Health in the United States

H. Jeong, University of Minnesota; J.R. Warren, University of Minnesota; L. Lao, Pennsylvania State University; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; J. Xu, Pennsylvania State University

Does intergenerational socieconomic mobility—that is, achieving an adult socioeconomic position that exceeds or falls short of one’s parents—impact health and well-being? Do mobility effects matter net of socioeconomic origins and destinations? Are any such effects homogenous across demographic subgroups? Using nationally representative U.S.

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Secondary School Quality and Midlife Cognition: Evidence from High School and Beyond

H. Chung, University of Minnesota; J.R. Warren, University of Minnesota; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; C. Muller, University of Texas; J. Manly, Columbia University; A. Brickman, Columbia University

Research on the association between education and later-life cognitive outcomes usually
only considers the quantity of schooling that people complete. However, people with the same level of completed schooling are highly diverse with respect to the quality of schooling they experienced. Using a unique new data resource, we ask how…

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The Contribution of School Quality to Stroke and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in the U.S. Stroke Belt

Emily Lybbert, University of Texas; Chandra Muller, University of Texas; Eric Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; John Robert Warren, University of Minnesota

Stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are important risk factors for later life dementia. In the United States the geographical distribution of high stroke risk, known as the U.S. Stroke Belt, is an important contributor to race and SES-based gradients in not only CVD but dementia as well. In this study we examine the impact that schools have…

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High School and Beyond: New Cohort Data for Studying the Social and Biological Pathways through which Education Shapes Midlife Cognition

Adam Brickman, Columbia University; Eric Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; Jennifer Manly, Columbia University; Chandra Muller, University of Texas; John Robert Warren, University of Minnesota

The purpose of this presentation is to describe the utility of the High School and Beyond (HSB) cohort for studying the impact of early life circumstances and experiences-- especially education-- on risk of midlife cognitive impairment. This nationally representative cohort has provided 40+ years of prospective data on a variety of topics.

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School Quality and Health at Midlife: Evidence from High School and Beyond

H. Chung, University of Minnesota; R. Warren, University of Minnesota; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin

Research on the association between education and later-life cognitive outcomes usually only considers the quantity of schooling that people complete. However, people with the same level of completed schooling are highly diverse with respect to the quality of schooling they experienced. Using a unique new data resource, we ask how secondary…

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Intergenerational Mobility and Health in the United States

H. Jeong, University of Minnesota; J.R. Warren, University of Minnesota; L. Lao, Pennsylvania State University; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; J. Xu, Pennsylvania State University

We examine (1) the effects of intergenerational occupational mobility on later-life physical and mental health and (2) how these effects vary by gender and race. While the effects of socioeconomic status on health are extensively investigated, we know much less about how individuals’ experience of mobility shapes long-term health outcomes.

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