Presentations

Below are upcoming research presentations using EdSHARe survey data from High School & Beyond and/or the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972. EdSHARe principal investigators, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and staff, and other researchers with access to the HS&B and/or NLS-72 data regularly present their findings at conferences and other academic gatherings. The listings below contain a brief overview of the topic and information on where and how to view the presentation. See the Previous Presentations sidebar for information on past presentations.

Presentations

Education and the Social Stratification of Pain at Midlife

E. Boschetti, University of Wisconsin-Madison; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; J. Warren, University of Minnesota; C. Muller, The University of Texas at Austin.

Chronic pain is an alarming and consequential health issue of global relevance, whose burden is, however, unevenly distributed across society. Existing studies stratify respondents by their level of education, but the relationship between education and pain may be confounded by socioeconomic background and knowledge accumulation. Using…

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Late-Life Science Knowledge and Association With Risk of COVID-19 Infection and Probability of COVID-19 Vaccination

I. Stade; J. Warren, University of Minnesota; E. Lybbert, The University of Texas.

We investigate the degree to which science knowledge—familiarity with basic scientific facts—is related to risk of COVID infection and vaccination. Using data from the High School & Beyond (HS&B) cohort study, we address this issue and consider the degree to which science knowledge accounts for social gradients in infection and…

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The Relationship Between School and Residential Segregation and Mental Health Outcomes in Midlife

R. Arias Achio, University of Minnesota; J. Warren, University of Minnesota; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; C. Muller, The University of Texas.

There is emerging interest in the relationship between residential and school segregation and racial and ethnic health disparities. Much of the current research looks at physical health outcomes, health behaviors, and healthcare access. However, The relationship between residential and school segregation and mental health is still…

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Educational Expectations and Serious Mental Illness Among Midlife Women

K. Shaulis, Pennsylvania State University.

The prevalence of serious mental illness (SMI) is rising among midlife adults in the United States. Recent supporting evidence uncovers gender differences in overall prevalence and an unexpected relationship with education. For the current midlife cohort, women were the driving force behind growing postsecondary enrollment during a time…

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Periodontal Disease and Cognitive Health

J. Himmelstern, University of Minnesota; J. Warren, University of Minnesota; R. Demmer, University of Minnesota; C. Muller, The University of Texas; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin.

Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) make up one of the leading causes of morbidity in older individuals. This is a concern for population health as the number of individuals impacted by ADRD is predicted to increases three-fold in the coming years. Although not often discussed in relation to ADRD, periodontal disease has been…

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Long-Term Impacts of Adolescent Exposure to Crime on Health: Self-reported Health and Mortality at Midlife

B. Gresham, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; E. Lybbert; M. Lubell, The University of Texas; C. Muller, The University of Texas; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin; J. Warren, University of Minnesota.

Exposure to crime is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for poor health outcomes and premature mortality, with adolescence serving as a period of heightened risk of exposure. As such, identifying the impact of adolescent exposure to crime on long-term health and mortality is critical.

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The Mediating Role of Occupational Complexity on Educational Attainment and Cognitive Health

J. Himmelstern, University of Minnesota; J. Warren, University of Minnesota; C. Muller, The University of Texas; E. Grodsky, University of Wisconsin.

Over the last few decades an increasing number of individuals in the United States have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Although there is currently no cure for ADRD, scholars argue that one third of dementia is theoretically preventable. Previous work has found that education and occupational complexity are…

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